May 232017
 

Today, author John Robin was kind enough to publish a guest post of mine about species and races in world building. You can read it here.

The article is drawn from Creating Life (The Art of World Building, #1), which  Amazon has listed as a hot new release in its category, currently at #4 (down one spot from yesterday).

 Posted by on May 23, 2017
May 022017
 

Creating Life (Vol. 1)Creating Life has been published in both eBook and paperback format! Join The Art of World Building mailing list to get the free templates! Chapter summaries are below.

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Chapter 1—Why Build a World?

While world building is expected in many genres of fantasy and SF, we must decide how many worlds to build. This will depend on our career plans and goals. Learn the advantages and disadvantages of building one world per story vs. one world for many stories, and when to take each approach. Sometimes doing both is best, allowing for greater depth in one world but the option to step away to keep things fresh. Using analogues can help us create believable societies quickly but has pitfalls that can be avoided. Do you have the ability to create many interesting worlds, and will they have enough depth to make the effort worth it?

Chapter 2—Creating Gods

Our species will invent gods to believe in even if we don’t invent them, so we may need some deities for people to reference in dialogue, whether praying or swearing. In SF, belief in gods may still exist despite, or even because of, advances in science. In fantasy, priests often call on a god to heal someone, and this requires having invented the gods. Pantheons offer advantages over a lone god, including dynamic relationships between them and the species. Half gods and demigods are other options that help us create myths and legends to enrich our world, especially if gods can be born, die, or be visited in their realm.

Myths about how the gods or species came to exist help people understand the purpose of their lives and what awaits them in death. Symbols, appearance, patronage, and willingness to impact the lives of their species all color a pantheon and world. Gods also create places people can visit or items that can fall into the wrong hands, offering possibilities for stories.

Chapter 3—Creating a Species

Audiences are familiar with using “race” to distinguish between humanoids, especially in fantasy, but species may be a more appropriate term. This chapter explores the meaning and implications of both words, with some examples of which one to use, when, and why.

Creating a species is challenging and time consuming, but the risks and rewards can be navigated and achieved, respectively. This chapter helps us decide on our goals and if the effort is worth it. SF writers might have little choice but to create species because there are no public domain species available like the elves, dwarves, and dragons of fantasy. The benefits of creating something different can outweigh the investment and help our work stand out.

An invented species must compete with legendary ones like elves, dwarves, and dragons; this chapter helps us achieve this. Starting with habitat helps us decide on physical adaptations that affect their minds, outlook, and society, and what a typical settlement might be like and even whether or not they live in jointly formed settlements. Their disposition affects their relationships with other species but can also limit their usefulness to us unless steps are taken to avoid this. Characteristics like intelligence, wisdom, and dexterity all play a role in how they can be used in our work, as does their society and world view, both affected by a history we can invent to integrate them with our world. Their familiarity with the supernatural and technology influences their prominence and how they compare to other life in our world.

Chapter 4—Creating World Figures

Villains, heroes, and more give our characters admired or despised individuals who’ve shaped the world and inspired them. Using Earth analogues can speed the invention of such world figures, though it’s best to change some details to obfuscate the similarities. Living figures can provide ongoing usefulness but the deceased can cast a long shadow, too. Their possessions can be just as famous and offer opportunities for our characters to find something helpful or dangerous. Family, friends, and enemies also provide ongoing possibilities for their life to impact our current characters.

Chapter 5—Creating Monsters

The difference between monsters, species, and animals is largely sophistication and numbers. Many monsters are created by accidents that turn an existing species or animal into something else, but sometimes monsters are created on purpose. In the latter case it’s especially important to decide who caused this. A monster’s habitat has an impact on its usefulness and sets the stage for creating atmosphere and characterization that will largely define our audience’s experience with it before the terrifying reveal. Its motivation in life, or in our work, also determines what it does and the sort of trouble it’s causing for our species.

Chapter 6—Creating Plants and Animals

In fantasy, creating plants and animals is optional due to expectations that the world is very Earth-like, but in SF that takes place away from Earth, audiences are more likely to expect new ones. It takes less time to create these than other life in this book, but we’ll want to consider our time investment, how often our setting will be used, whether our creations impact our work and the impression it creates, and whether the desire to do something unique and new is worthwhile for both us and our audience.

Plants and animals are classified into categories, such as cycads, conifers, and flowering plants, and amphibians, birds, fish, mammals, and reptiles. The lifecycle of the former and the behavior of the latter help distinguish them and can be used to propel or inhibit stories involving them. While we may have purposes for them as an author, our world’s inhabitants have them, too, such as decoration and medicinal uses for plants, and domestication, sports, guards, pets and transportation for animals. Both can be used for food and materials to enrich life and our world.

Chapter 7—Creating Undead

Many types of undead already exist and are public domain, and it’s challenging to invent something new. Undead are often classified by appearance and behavior, but it is also their origins and how they can be destroyed that will help distinguish our undead from pre-existing types. The two basic ones are those with a body, like zombies, and those without, like ghosts. Those with a body might have a soul or not. We can decide on the mental faculties of our undead by deciding if the mind goes with the soul, but there are other factors that can impair the minds and even emotional states of undead. All of these affect behavior, as do their origins, goals, and what they’re capable of.

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 Posted by on May 2, 2017
May 022017
 

On the eve of publishing Creating Life, I just received a great endorsement from bestselling author Piers Anthony! Impeccable timing.

“I read Creating Life (The Art of World Building, #1), by Randy Ellefson…It is exhaustive, well written, and knowledgeable…I, as a successful science fiction and fantasy writer, have generated many worlds, so this material is familiar, but it would have been easier and probably better had I had a reference like this. It is realistic, recognizing that the average writer may not have the patience to work out all the details before getting into the action…”

 Posted by on May 2, 2017
Jan 292017
 

Creating Life (The Art of World Building, #1) has been written and is now being edited by JJ Henke, who’s worked with me for years on various projects. I should have it back in about two weeks. Then it will take another couple of weeks to go through all the suggested changes and format it for release.

In theory I could publish it in about a month, but to do things right, I need more time. I’m hoping to get some endorsements to help with promotion. I also must line up more of what I intend with ads, blog tours, and the like.

In the meantime, I’m hard at work on Creating Places (Volume 2) and making great progress.

 Posted by on January 29, 2017
Jan 042017
 

The Screaming MoragulHere’s the cover for the next Talon Stormbringer book, The Screaming Moragul. The story is named after the ghostly ship that will give Talon and his crew trouble from beyond the grave. It’s my version of The Flying Dutchman. The ship is named after a carrion bird of my invention for Llurien, where all the Stormbringer stories are set. Look for this to be released later this year.

 

 Posted by on January 4, 2017
Nov 212016
 

The Epic of RonynYou know you’re too busy when you forget to announce a new release! Doh.

“The Epic of Ronyn” story from the forthcoming The Tales of Llurien is now available. It’s an over the top adventure that will have you laughing and wanting more stories featuring the lead. I do intent to use Ronny in a series of adventures. He’s too much fun for just one story!

Blurb

There’s no higher calling than suffering for art.

Wanting to impress a woman, the minstrel Ronyn tells the story of how he became the King of All Bards, facing horrors the likes of which few had ever seen. In his tale, neither malevolent creatures nor like-minded adventurers would stand between him and a prize that would make him a musician beyond compare. On hearing his epic quest, kings had welcomed him, lads had become men, and virgin lasses had blossomed into women. It’s no wonder he must tell this new admirer about himself, but will she be as impressed with Ronyn as he is with himself?

 Posted by on November 21, 2016
Oct 032016
 

The Ever FiendThe Ever Fiend has been released today! Hopefully this will be the start of a great career. You can help out by grabbing a copy. Click the button to buy from your preferred vendor, or if you’re smarter, you’ll just join my mailing list and get an eBook copy for FREE!

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Self-Publishing Review had this to say: “Randy Ellefson has really made himself a name to watch with this title as his debut. With strong writing, strong characters, this is a strong introduction to Talon Stormbringer and what to expect in his upcoming series. This is a wholly professional product with a beautiful cover and a great amount of care taken on the piece throughout. It’s great to see a fantasy read with this amount of love poured into it, with the skill and know-how to make it gleam. A stand-out for dark fantasy, Talon Stormbringer brings the thunder in his first proper outing. Let’s hope to see more of his adventures and misadventures very, very soon! 4.5 stars”

star-badge4-5

 Posted by on October 3, 2016
Sep 292016
 

The page on rhaikan has been uploaded. Some highlights:

Rhaikan are a race of the jhaikan species. The gods of truth, empathy, peace, and fairness created the more benevolent race using a magical jewel. Rhaikan keep talons on hands and feet shorn, particularly the latter, to appear less threatening. They tend to dress fashionably and neatly to cultivate an appearance of calmness, order, and being non-threatening. Most rhaikan live in joint settlements because they won’t be trusted by other species if they don’t.

Many rhaikan become knights and are among the best fighters. They are good swordsmen but need special rhaikan swords to fig their larger hands. These are huge swords that others must use with two hands. Jhaikan often pretend to be rhaikan to infiltrate settlements.

 Posted by on September 29, 2016
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